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fading memories: albums damage photos

by:Dezheng     2020-04-04
Glen in Cole Forest cable
1987 This is a digital version of an article from The Times Print Archive, before it starts online in 1996.
To keep these articles as they appear initially, the Times will not change, edit, or update them.
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This album is a warehouse of many of the country\'s 64 million families with precious memories, often damaging the images it holds.
Research has shown that the material and structure of many new imported albums, as well as the millions of albums purchased in the past few years, have created a harsh environment for photo printing.
Dangerous are black and white photos and color snaps that record the lives of millions of people over the past 40 years.
\"A significant part of a lot of family heritage is in danger of losing, but few people are aware of it,\" James M said . \"
Riley, director of the Institute of image permanence, Rochester Institute of Technology.
\"It is thought that by putting these family treasures on the album, they will be preserved forever and passed on to future generations,\" said Judith Watson . \", Conservation officer at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, California.
In many cases, however, these albums help accelerate their deterioration.
Douglas Severson said: \"The shoe boxes may be better ads in some albums, and the photos are destroyed much faster than you have left them in the shoe box, \"The administrator of the Chicago Institute of Art.
He is the chairman of the photography team of the American Nature Conservation Association, a national organization of professional conservation personnel and researchers.
The situation is getting worse, he said.
Reilly, \"because the material in the album is getting cheaper and cheaper\" because the store sells very low
Pricing album imported from Far East.
Storage area for many family photo albums-
Attic and basement
That adds to the problem, sir.
Severson said because they exposed the photos to large fluctuations in destructive heat, humidity and temperature.
A recent study by the Rochester Institute shows the extent of damage caused by the poor
\"The quality of the material is much worse than we thought . \"Reilly said.
The worst album, the music administrator says, is the most common Album: The Worst Album
Called magnetic album
It doesn\'t have a magnet, but its cardboard page grabs a photo on a layer of plastic-covered adhesive coating that is stripped back to locate the photo.
In an album like this, cheap
The high-quality cardboard emits peroxide, resulting in yellow staining on the white of black and white and colored prints, \'Mr. Reilly said.
The plastic cover can be harmful, not only because it completely seals the photo with cardboard, but also because the plastic releases gas to attack the photo.
\"Only certain plastics are considered safe,\" he said. \"It\'s not the kind you find on cheap albums . \"Reilly.
The best plastic is polyester (
Trade name Mylar)
Polyethylene, polypropylene, triacetate and Tyvek. In addition, Sir.
Severson said, \"the tape material can be devastating to the photo and transfer itself to the print. \'\' Ms.
Fortson explained that a bond formed between the final adhesive and the photo, \"so you can\'t take out the photo without destroying it.
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This is by no means the only album type that is harmful. Mr.
Riley says the black background paper used in many old albums is pit
This piece of paper gives out the oxidation gas that attacks the image of the photo.
\"The acid used for paper making will not only endanger the chemical action of the photo on the print, but also endanger the decomposition effect of the photo on the print.
\"In some old albums, the page has been smashed,\" said Mr. Reilly said.
Rubber cement, animal glue and glue are also harmful for mounting prints and pastedown photo-
Mounting angle.
Most albums in 1940s and earlier with black and white photos, \"If you look closely, there is some evidence of damage to the album material or structure,\" Mr. Reilly said.
Most photos are now colored, but now, more than 90% of the 14 billion snapshots taken each year in the United States are colored.
Those who grew up during the almost universal spread of color snapshots belong to the era of the most recorded photos in history. Yet Mr.
\"Their parents will have a more lasting record because their childhood photos are taken entirely in black and white films,\" said Severson, who has more stable images.
\"From color prints of 50 and 60, it is very rare to find that there is no obvious change,\" he said . \".
\"Now, the visual heritage of a generation is disappearing.
These are the people among them.
Their Childhood Photos were taken at the age of 50 and 60.
\"Some album manufacturers in the country say the material they are using now will not damage the photos.
\"We have been using non for eight years.
\"PVC plastic,\" said John W . \"Brooks Jr.
Holson, president of Wilton, Connecticut.
It is the largest album manufacturer in the United States, with a 30% share in the U. S. market. Mr.
Brooks mentioned PVC plastics that cause irreversible damage to the print.
Henry Kaska, spokesman for Eastman Kodak in Rochester, said that in the album sold by Kodak, \"all components have been tested and it is acceptable to store pictures.
\"The quality of the Archives has a professional manufacturer who has provided the archives for a long time --
The library and other agencies claim that it is best for their albums to provide paper, plastic, adhesive and binding materials that do the least damage to the photos.
These fees range from $30 to $50, compared to $2 to $15 charged by department stores and discount stores for albums that do not have archived quality.
John Boral, vice president of University Products, said: \"We don\'t believe you can make a truly secure album for less than $30 or $40, including pages . \"
Huo Shan, the masses.
Business is booming for such manufacturers.
\"We have seen a significant increase in private interest in our photo albums,\" said Dennis Inch, vice president of Light Impressions, a Rochester manufacturer.
Helping \"home archivists\" many administrators try to provide information through lectures and workshops about possible damage to the \"home archivists\" album, he said, is defined as \"the person in most families who keeps family records, collects photos and delivers family trees \". Reilly.
Those who are trying to save photos may also be helping historians. Fortson said.
\"Seemingly ordinary photos can be important in terms of what people don\'t know,\" she said . \".
Historians use photos in large quantities when recording culture
Identify things such as clothing style and interior and exterior of the house.
\"A version of this article appears on page 1001052 of the national edition of October 3, 1987, with the title: Faded memory: photo album damaged photos.
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